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20130129
20130206
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> cut us off a little bit. >> david, let's talk about energy efficiency. i know fluorescent lights and bulbs are a big issues right now. people are changing old-style fluorescent bulbs. what's the old one, the new one and the savings? >> the standard of the industry were t-12. this was a four-foot lamp. the 12 stands for and and it's about four or five times more efficient than the typical incandescent light bulb. in the energy to increase energy efficiency. they have a more efficient standard. it's a two footer. it's called the t-8. it's half an inch in diameter. these are bi-pin fluorescent fixtures. these are 10, 15% for efficient than the older t-12. all of the fixtures bought now have the t-8. >> i understand they're going to stop making t-12 bulbs. >> it is scheduled for extinction. >> along the same lines, the city of san francisco is considering an ordinance to require the conversion from the old 212 to t-8 efficiency fixtures or higher. >> there are discussions. many of the large owners have gone to retrofits because there is a very good payback on it. the only commercial
hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead
by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco whi
but industry led. you should be able to get your own energy data in a machine readable format you can then give to companies, organizations like the ones being celebrated here today to provide real value to you such as saving money, improving energy efficiency, and protecting the environment. so, the green button here we are in san francisco, i can say with some public comfort that pg&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that
that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ [ applause ] >> okay. good afternoon afternoon. it is my pleasure to welcome you all here on behalf of the board of directors of st. anthony foundation. this is the groundbreaking for our brand-new dining room with mercy housing 90 units of affordable housing for seniors. [applause] [applause] this is one of the finest examples of collaboration in the non-profit sentor sector and i'm proud to be part of it. on behalf of the board of
happen you can get it done and i just want to thank you guys for all your energy and excitement you bring to san francisco and for the giants day in and day out. you all are the best. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> well, -- audience: romo, romo. >> well, first off congratulations san francisco. we definitely couldn't have done it without you guys. i will venture to say -- there is one thing i noticed about my team we are a great example of this city. look at the diversity of personalities, where we all come from, the different faces from different stories and we all have one goal in mine. we had one job in mine. we had one dream in mine and that is to be world series champions with this group and i am proud to say that. you guys the same thing. we couldn't have done it without you, the city of san francisco. like i said you guys better be proud. you need to be proud and i will tell you for dang sure we are all world series champions and wearing orange and black in san francisco. [cheers and applause] >> all right. now i would like to introduce two more gentlemen. the firs
like to ask you a little bit about the national security implications of our energy policy, an issue of much concern in the news and certainly here in silicon valley. what might you say about the relationship between energy policy and some of the national security challenges that the fbi is addressing? >> one of the nice things about my job is i generally stay away from policy, but when it comes to energy resources and the like, there are a number of -- you can look at it from the geopolitical perspective, which is not something that really bears on what we do day in and day out. if you put in context the potential cyber attacks and the concerns we have about cyber attacks on our infrastructure, there is an intersection between the vulnerabilities we have and our energy and electrical grids and the like from cyber attacks, which keep all of us busy. i would just go back to one other thing that i did not address in the question before, and that is the balance between privacy interests, civil rights interests, and the like, and the necessity to address these threats. every day, there i
, the place where you are in the know. i am currently a director of the california clean energy fund, also a long serving member of the commonwealth club. please turn off all your noise- making devices. we will get under way in just a moment, but first, i want to tell you a bit about a couple of upcoming programs. next monday, november 21, tom brokaw, nbc news correspondent and author, will discuss the current mood of america. this will be a program starting at 1:00 p.m. at the santa clara convention center. on tuesday, november 29, paula kerger, who is president of pbs, and the president of kqed will discuss the challenges facing public broadcasting and how the challenges impact our program choices. this will be a 6:00 p.m. program here in san francisco at the commonwealth club. it is my pleasure to extend a special welcome to any new members of the commonwealth club who are here today. we know you are going to enjoy your membership and look forward to seeing you often. if you are not a member yet, today is a great time to join. if you have questions, the staff will be available to answer
into the small art gallery of public works. part of the energy of the venue comes from having that art gallery. having a small workshop with a few resident artists who work on art during the day. it provides a certain energy. when that moves on to the employees were working there during the night, coming in contact with patrons, you have a great start and a good experience. great talent, visuals, who have done the other thing for the most part. lots of responses. >> thank you. dmitri, while enhancing your out dope -- outdoor event, how important is the creative contact to make sure it you have customers who return over and over again? >> our creative content, you know, it is pretty out there. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot
congress. take the movement energy into those stairs -- spheres with the ideas matter of the heart of occupy. >> winter is coming. cities like san francisco and oakland and other cities are closing down the encampments and chasing people off. you can drive 90 miles from davis and pepper spray. it is hard to maintain people's attention for long periods of time. i am wondering -- should they be occupying the supreme court? [applause] >> i was talking about that today. with all respect for putting your body on the line which captivated the imagination in the beginning, it now needs to be less about states and place -- spaces and places and more about going to wear in justice -- injustice is. there are plans to occupy the supreme court from the second anniversary of the citizens united decision. that crazy decision has given the rights to corporations to unleash their treasuries into our already polluted political system. go there. go to your local congresspersons office. go to banks charging student loans up the highest rates. go to those places. i think we will see more of that. occu
courage that it takes to be up here. a lot of energy to the healing circle as well. as a juvenile, i was in juvenile hall and i went through that whole system myself. i have worked with tattoo removal, i went to other development programs. through personal experience and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up
mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the elevator. imagine you are going into the airport. you would not get on the first airplane departing, you would get on the airplane that is going to the city you are going. we are doing the same here. in this case, we are going to the ninth floor. this building has security, so i also have an access card, which gives us permission, and then we go to the assigned elevator, which is elevator a. >> and this is only stopping at floors 4 and 9. i do not see any buttons in here at all, except for the door and the alarm. >> we only have the standard buttons required by code and safety, but there is no need to have floor numbers anymore. >> and it does not make a lot of stops. it goes to your floor and everyone else. >> the system it efficiency, because
it will never happen -- when you do not have the energy anymore? that scared of a piece of blank paper and a collection coming up in six weeks -- that does not scare you? >> yes, but i tried to protect myself. for example, i go to a flea market, and nt place. when i see something that i find interesting, even if i have no interest in anything at the moment, i say that one day i will do something from that. i know that there was work on it. i think i have to burn it, because at the end, i take too much time to look at it. but, yes, i mean, to be honest, i think will realize what time that i have no more of the passion, which will mean i will stop. i think it is better. honestly, before i was doing that profession, because i was not at peace with the fact that i was rejected, so i was inventing a lot of things. at the moment, i started to work -- i finish. because i do the things that i'd love to do, why should i live now. there's no reason to lie? because i am accepted through my work? why should i lie? because i do not want to live again in my old days. but i will always interested in
was t thing, and the code got crinkled, i could not do anything. >> the mental energy the other people are using to make useful products in the world, things that people need, we have spent our entire lives trying to amuse ourselves. that is all we know how to do. so we are better at it than people who have real jobs the them i think that is absolutely right. if you want to feed your family, let's say, you have to discipline yourself. there is also a way of looking at the world. once again, my friend larry david, he would take a little more salt and make a whole meal out of it. it is about looking at the world with a certain attitude. >> there are a lot of people who are funny and have a sense of humor, but they get sidetracked into productive work. we do not let that happen. [laughter] >> i am afraid we are out of time. as hard as it is to believe. [applause] >> thank you. >> i do not even think we can ask a final question because it would take us past our time. >> our thanks to dave barry and alan zweibel, authors of "blue knit 6." -- lunatic." we also want to remind everyone here in
doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of t
detail, the energy and time that the young people committed to make sure we created of the awareness of human trafficking. i want to highlight that there is a calendar of events. if any of you would like to continue to be involved i encourage you to either yourself be involved or pass out the information. today there will be a human trafficking 101 session that we encourage you to attend so we understand this issue in hybrids at seven cisco. thank you to the chief of police, the chief of probation, carmen chu, and we appreciate everyone being here including the district attorney's office for being part of this cause. thank you. (applause) come and experience lafayette park and enjoy the people, picnic and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take an afternoon stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located at got and sacramento street in the middle of pacific heights on top of the city's steep rolling hills, lafayette park offers a great place, peaceful beauty. comfortably spaced tables and benches, a playground, rest rooms and tips at the end of the park. plenty of flat areas for f
intellectually, i made up for in energy. i intervened on the basis that he was a child that had been subjected to incredible abuse. he was very much a kid and the child welfare system. it happens too many violent youth. i intervened, and he was never prosecuted. he was 14 years old, he was put into what would be thought of now has a psychiatric facility. it was a child psychiatric facility. he underwent all kinds of treatment, training, came out, went back to school. it really went through recovery. and then graduated high school, went to community college, and i would like someone to guess what profession he wound up going into. law enforcement. he was not with the lapd. he was with a smaller police department for 30 years. he has since retired. he has been married twice. he has raised four children. he has lived an extraordinary life. i am grateful for having had him in my life as a guidepost. i do think it is the ultimate irony that he turned out to be a police officer. >> we have some other questions. very good questions. we do not have much time. i work at san quentin prison. they segrega
the poster submissions presented here. please look at the fine detail, the energy and time that the young people committed to make sure we created of the awareness of human trafficking. i want to highlight that there is a calendar of events. if any of you would like to continue to be involved i encourage you to either yourself be involved or pass out the information. today there will be a human trafficking 101 session that we encourage you to attend so we understand this issue in hybrids at seven cisco. thank you to the chief of police, the chief of probation, carmen chu, and we appreciate everyone being here including the district attorney's office for being part of this cause. thank you. (applause)
in criminal justice and all your energies and efforts on its behalf. we know this is an issue that is of great importance to the state of california and to the nation. of course we have the opportunity to yet again lead the way here in california. we're offering a bill this year, s.b.-1506 which would redefine the crime of simple possession of a drug from felony to misdemeanor. there are 13 other states, and the federal government which already do this and in the 13 other states, we have the data that shows that we get better results, better outcomes, meaning safer communities, and surprisingly the states include not only the large eastern states of pennsylvania and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintend
of time and energy on things like social resolutions. how do you create a culture where people can report problems to each other? which i will talk about in a second, so cue up the next slide. >> dave, can i interrupt for a second? one of the things that i noticed they think is really important for people in the school space and probably law enforcement to remember is that social media platforms whatever it is and you name it -- what? a million apps for the mobile platform alone. those are not the context of bullying. school life, school, peer life, peer relations. that's the concept of bullying whether it's bullying or cyber bullying and this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an alternate reality or something separate or add on that the school and the
. it is offgassing and reflecting all the energy. >> in the middle, we are waiting to see if the fire spreads. it is spreading from the one end down. >> the second one has the same material for exposure. it is comparing two buildings with the same protection, against two buildings with the same protection for the main fire building, one for exposure and next to it. the second one is catching. >> we have environmental factors effecting this. we have wind blowing in a certain direction. the exposure on the one next to it not really any heat. this is a good demonstration. >> the interesting deal right off the bat is that one burned down and this one -- >> has yet to ignite. >> i see spoke. >> just the products inside that are burning. >> wow. very exciting. >> so i can imagine -- i'm with the building department, there are real implication for providing fire resistive safety in buildings if we can figure out how to properly apply it and make sure people don't cut holes in it. >> there are fire service and dynamics that go there. the building industry and manufacturers love the late weigh
coming to the table, different perspectives, that energy and enthusiasm around thinking differently, and around paradigm shifts, around developing breakthrough technologies, and to be able to attract those people to this area is crucial. i think that that is something that has been a benefit of being here, that a lot of people are attracted to silicon valley. that is crucial to any company starting in taking their technology to the next level. >> can you talk about the incubator? >> yes. >> the qb3? >> yes, mission bay, everybody knows. uc san francisco has conduct encourage it with research. some of the larger companies that research labs in mission bay as well. bayer and others. they are even innovating about their laboratories, because it is so expensive to build your own laboratory. so they are trying to bring some of these pharmaceutical answers to the market faster. they have an incredible spirit of innovation in those laboratories. and they are inviting other companies, not just from the bay area air even our country, they're inviting international. we had our first canadian
. keep? energy bars. dry food. canned vegetables. can corn, can peas, you can drain that and drink the water and eat the vegetables. buy can food that you eat normally. and a can opener. first aid kit, have 3. have you a small one in the car, have a nice sized one for home and make sure you have one at work. make sure if you are a diabetic or have a heart condition, something that you normal take have a little supply. have a storage area for this. consider this. if you have a supply kit, make sure you have one that's mobile. mobile meaning, if you have to evacuate a square mile for disaster or terrorist or anything, have it in there with you in case you are on your own for a bit. you might not be in your home. you might be somewhere else. there's a tsunami coming in. if you have kids at home what do you keep for them? make sure you keep them entertained and have food they like. the most useful tool in a disaster? scissors. if you use clothes you will be cold. [inaudible]. duct tape. many uses. you want garbage bags. line the toilet with trash bags. you want to line it, line it up
fund. we are looking for businesses that are looking to put in more energy-efficient equipment or retrofit or remove toxins from processed here we have been lending to drive cleaners that are giving you more environmentally friendly products, truck drivers putting in new exhaust systems. finally, just to give you kind of a scale of what we do, mark mentioned the sba right guaranteed 275 loans in a year. we expected to 50 or 60 in san francisco this year, and more like 250 or 300 throughout the bay area. if you are hearing something interesting and you want to talk, the dominant in the purple suit has been handing me question cards out. >> i am the ne community federal
of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consuming pumps. valves open to regulate the flow into the 85-mile-long delaware aqueduct -- the longest tunnel in the world. at hillview reservoir... the water is partitioned into another giant tunnel system. where it travels deep below manhattan. the pressure built up by gravity from the mountains pushes the water upwards toward the surface through vertical shafts. these shafts feed the water mains of each neighborhood, which branch into smaller pipes below the streets... feeding into buildings and houses, into the plumbing, and finally, after its long journey, to our faucets. providing water to homes and industry is a monumental task, requiring immense infrastructure. but once the water is delivered and used, it must also be taken away. man: it's important that the waste generated by any society not be left around. cholera, and other diseases and problems, have been spread, because people wound up living in filth. even the ancients understood that you couldn't have the sewage where you lived. and the easiest thing to do was transp
and energy into bullying, i found myself asking, how do we know it's working? there are a lot of things that seem intuitively plausible and appear to be anecdotally moving the ball forward, but we need to move beyond that. we need to, among other things, figure out what indeed are practices that work and we need to understand in so doing that what may work in sioux falls may not work in san francisco. we get that. so solutions need to be taylored to local communities, solutions need to reflect the fact that there are many, many dimensions to this issue. let me tell you about the few dimensions that we see in the course of our work. russ land is the assistant attorney general and we've taken partnership to new levels with the department. they have put out guidance on bullying and distributed it to all the jurisdictions around the country because we've often seen in our work that there are so many superintendents and school leaders that are doing great things, but there are others that either have the wrong policies in place or, quite frankly, don't know what to do. and so what they
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)